See what we have in store for the eighth edition of

ANTWERP MUN

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Committees and topics

Get to know the committees in which you can participate and the topics we have chosen.

Memberstates: (till 2020):
Afghanistan, Angola, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Bahrein, Bangladesh, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chile, China, Croatia, Cuba, Czechia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Egypt, Eritrea, Fiji, Hungary, Iceland, India, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Qatar, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Slovakia, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Togo, Tunisia, Ukraine, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and Uruguay

General info:
The Human Rights Council is an inter-governmental body within the United Nations system responsible for strengthening the promotion and protection of human rights around the globe and for addressing situations of human rights violations and make recommendations on them. As a delegate in the UNHRC you will be representing a member state of your choice and try to form a resolution with other states present regarding the topic of the session.

Topic:
The Right to Privacy in a Digital Age: Advances in information communication technology are dramatically improving real-time communication and information sharing and have drastically transformed the way humans interact. For millions of people, the Digital Age was one of emancipation, and perhaps the greatest liberation movement the world has ever known. Human rights defenders, activists, democratic voices, minorities and others can now communicate via digital platforms and participate in the global debate in ways that were previously unimaginable. Their voices are amplified and abuses can be exposed, which offers the improved enjoyment of human rights. Moreover, over one million people have participated electronically in the open dialogue and consultation that was conducted to develop a framework for the Sustainable Development Goals, which calls for the full inclusion of human rights.
At the same time, deep concerns have been expressed on the fact that these new technologies are vulnerable to electronic surveillance and interception. As the previous High Commissioner for Human Rights has cautioned in several statements, such surveillance threatens individual rights -including to privacy and to freedom of expression and association – and hinders the free functioning of a vibrant civil society.
International human rights law provides a full-bodied and universal framework for the promotion and protection of the right to privacy, including in the context of domestic and extraterritorial surveillance, the interception of digital communications and the collection of personal data. However, many States’ practices show a lack of adequate national legislation and enforcement, weak procedural safeguards and ineffective oversight, which has contributed to widespread impunity for arbitrary or unlawful interference with the right to privacy. Therefore, there is a need for better implementation at the national level of the international norms related to the right to privacy, through adequate national legislation and stronger safeguards and oversight: The powers of governments to access communication-related data should be based on a clear and transparent legal framework that clearly expressed advances in technology and that is at the same time in conformity with international human rights norms and standards.
Also, the United Nations plays a vital role in promoting the international legal standards that guide actions of private companies, as they seek to respect the human rights of their customers and other users. Businesses look to the United Nations for support in promoting the adoption of those standards in the domestic law of Member States. The United Nations has the unique ability to convene all stakeholders and to explore the most effective means of protecting the right to privacy. We must emphasise that the Human Rights Council should continue to address the issue, with increased engagement of civil society. Consideration should also be given to the need to establish a new special procedures mandate on the right to privacy, to examine existing challenges and how the right should be conceptualized more broadly.

Member states:
193 states (list is online) Non-member obersver states: Palestine, Holy See

General info:
The General Assembly is the main deliberative policymaking and representative organ within the United Nations system. The UNGA strives to reach specific goals to aatain peace, security and disarmament along with development and poverty eradication; to safeguard human rights and promote the rule of law; to protect our common environment; to meet the special needs of Africa; and to strengthen the United Nations. As a delegate in the UNGA you will be representing a member state of your choice and try to form a resolution with other states present regarding the topic of the meeting.

Topic:
Global Warming and Climate refugees:Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment: The world’s average surface temperature is likely to surpass 3 degrees centigrade this century. Shifting weather patterns threaten food production and rising sea levels increase the risk of catastrophic flooding. Limited natural resources such as drinking water are likely to become even scarcer in many parts of the world. Crops and livestock struggle to survive in climate change ‘hotspots’ where conditions become too hot and dry, or too cold and wet, threatening livelihoods and aggravating food insecurity. The impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale. Without drastic action today (Sustainable Development Goal 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts), adapting to these impacts in the future will be more difficult and costly. 
Right now, climate change is affecting every country on every continent. It is disrupting national economies and affecting lives, costing people, communities and countries dearly today and even more tomorrow. Also does this global challenge not respect national borders, which affects the poorest and most vulnerable people the most: Families and communities are trying to adapt to the changing environment, but many are being forcibly displaced from their homes by the effects of climate change and disasters, or are relocating in order to survive. People displaced across borders in the context of climate change and disasters may in some circumstances be in need of international protection.
Global challenges truly require global solutions. The United Nations General Assembly, which includes a significant number of environmentally vulnerable countries, is uniquely placed to accelerate efforts for Environment and Climate Action. We will pave the way to look at means of implementation regarding climate financing, capacity building and transfer of low carbon technologies. Moreover, given the harmful impact of the prevalent use and ineffective waste management of plastics on global health, food security and ecosystems, we will undertake a strong global campaign against plastic pollution in order to contribute to build cleaner waters and oceans. This will require a collective effort involving all relevant stakeholders from private, public and civic sectors to identify best practices and efforts towards sustainable consumption and production.


Member states: 193 states (list is online) Non-member obersver states: Palestine, Holy See

General info: This General Assembly is reserved for students who are younger than 18 years old or delegations from secondary schools.
The General Assembly is the main deliberative policymaking and representative organ within the United Nations system. The UNGA strives to reach specific goals to aatain peace, security and disarmament along with development and poverty eradication; to safeguard human rights and promote the rule of law; to protect our common environment; to meet the special needs of Africa; and to strengthen the United Nations. As a delegate in the UNGA you will be representing a member state of your choice and try to form a resolution with other states present regarding the topic of the meeting.

Topic:
Global Warming and Climate refugees:Climate Change is the defining issue of our time and we are at a defining moment: The world’s average surface temperature is likely to surpass 3 degrees centigrade this century. Shifting weather patterns threaten food production and rising sea levels increase the risk of catastrophic flooding. Limited natural resources such as drinking water are likely to become even scarcer in many parts of the world. Crops and livestock struggle to survive in climate change ‘hotspots’ where conditions become too hot and dry, or too cold and wet, threatening livelihoods and aggravating food insecurity. The impacts of climate change are global in scope and unprecedented in scale. Without drastic action today (Sustainable Development Goal 13: Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts), adapting to these impacts in the future will be more difficult and costly. 
Right now, climate change is affecting every country on every continent. It is disrupting national economies and affecting lives, costing people, communities and countries dearly today and even more tomorrow. Also does this global challenge not respect national borders, which affects the poorest and most vulnerable people the most: Families and communities are trying to adapt to the changing environment, but many are being forcibly displaced from their homes by the effects of climate change and disasters, or are relocating in order to survive. People displaced across borders in the context of climate change and disasters may in some circumstances be in need of international protection.
Global challenges truly require global solutions. The United Nations General Assembly, which includes a significant number of environmentally vulnerable countries, is uniquely placed to accelerate efforts for Environment and Climate Action. We will pave the way to look at means of implementation regarding climate financing, capacity building and transfer of low carbon technologies. Moreover, given the harmful impact of the prevalent use and ineffective waste management of plastics on global health, food security and ecosystems, we will undertake a strong global campaign against plastic pollution in order to contribute to build cleaner waters and oceans. This will require a collective effort involving all relevant stakeholders from private, public and civic sectors to identify best practices and efforts towards sustainable consumption and production.


Member states (2020): Permanent members: China, Russian Federation, United States, France, the United Kingdom, Non-permanent members: Belgium, Dominican Republic, Estonia, Germany, Indonesia, Niger, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, South Africa, Tunisia, Viet Nam

General Info: The Security Council is an inter-governmental body within the United Nations system responsible for maintaining international peace and security. The UNSC is the only organ within the UN that makes decisions that the member states are obligated to implement under the charter, other organs can only make recommendations. As a delegate in the UNSC you will be representing a member state of your choice and try to form a resolution with other states present regarding the topic of the session, while also reacting to any possible international crisis that may occur.

Topic:
The issue of Nuclear Disarmament: The issue should be approached on two grounds: nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament of already existing nuclear weapons. Ever since the establishment of nuclear weapons the United Nations has fought to eliminate their existence. A number of multilateral treaties have been established with the aim of preventing nuclear proliferation and testing, while promoting progress in nuclear disarmament. Although a majority of the international community is on the same page regarding the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, this can not be generalised for all states. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty was not ratified by India, Pakistan and Israel. North Korea withdrew itself and recent events in Iran show that it is not unimaginable that supporters of the treaty might establish nuclear weapons after all. Delegates should come up with comprehensive solutions to improve the certainty of non-proliferation, taking following questions into account: How can illegal distribution of nuclear weapons be prevented? How will these solutions be enforced? Which political and economic agreements can enforce your own state or other states to support non-proliferation? Which measures will be taken when a nuclear threat occurs?
Delegates should also debate the disarmament of existing nuclear weapons. While the states already in possession of nuclear weapons at the time of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, highly support non-proliferation in other states, they are less eager to start with the disarmament of their own nuclear weapons, even though this was also a part of the treaty. The reluctancy to start complete or transparent disarmament is accompanied by an atmosphere of distrust, between nuclear-capable states as well as between nuclear-capable states and states who are not in possession of nuclear weapons. Delegates should consider questions such as: What can be done to build trust among nuclear-capable states and what concessions must be granted to reduce the nuclear stockpiles of these nations? How can countries be transparent in the disarmament process? And if an agreement is reached, how will this be enforced?

Memberstates: (till 2020):
Andorra, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Benin, Brazil, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Chad, China, Colombia, Denmark, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Eswatini, Ethiopia, France, Germany, Ghana, India, Iran, Ireland, Jamaica, Japan, Malawi, Mali, Malta, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands, Norway, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, United States of America, Uruguay, Venezuela and Yemen

General info:
The Human Rights Council is an inter-governmental body within the United Nations system responsible for strengthening the promotion and protection of human rights around the globe and for addressing situations of human rights violations and make recommendations on them. As a delegate in the UNHRC you will be representing a member state of your choice and try to form a resolution with other states present regarding the topic of the session.

Topic:
Protecting women in migration from human trafficking, sexual slavery and exploitation:
According to the UN, approximately 191 million persons currently live in a different country than where they were born, especially the migration of people from non-developed countries to more developed countries is strongly accompanied by smuggling. In this smuggle industry a lot of migrants are exposed to the dangers of human trafficking and especially women and girls to sexual slavery and sexual exploitation. Over the past few years the international community, NGO’s and state governments have grown highly concerned with the phenomenon of human trafficking. The number of migrants has almost doubled in the past two decades and with so many people crossing borders illegally, often desperate and defenceless, the problem of human trafficking and exploitation is becoming one of world’s most pressing human rights violations.
In this council, delegates will seek especially to protect the rights of women and girls since this is an extra vulnerable group, exposed to trafficking for numerous purposes such as sexual and economic exploitation, particularly prostitution and pornography, forced labour, including for work in commercial agriculture and domestic work, arranged marriages or to be ‘sold’ as brides, recruitment for participation in hostilities and such related purposes as sexual services, portage and domestic functions in conflict situations.
The issue of human trafficking and exploitation is particularly troubling because of two main issues. First of all, there is an enormous lack of quantitative and qualitative data on trafficking practices. Secondly, there is a lot of uncertainty in defining the crime, which is especially problematic from a legal perspective. Treaties concerning the issue often struggle with flaws such as overly specific definitions, this combined with insufficient enforcement mechanisms. Most of these problems are caused because of the fact that the debate concerning the issue is relatively new. Delegates should look for answers on questions such as: What are workable and all-encompassing definitions? How can we build a cross-border framework to protect women and girls during illegal migration exposed to these dangers? How can we build a better legal framework and enforcement mechanism to sanction human traffickers? How can we gather more data and information with the specific details of human trafficking all around the world?

Member states: All the members of the UNGA except: Cook islands and Niue, Observer states: Holy See, Palestine, Chinese Taipei (Taiwan)

General Info: The World Health Organization is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health by providing leadership on matters critical to health and engaging in partnerships where joint action is needed; shaping the research agenda and stimulating the generation, translation and dissemination of valuable knowledge; setting norms and standards and promoting and monitoring their implementation; articulating ethical and evidence-based policy options; providing technical support, catalysing change, and building sustainable institutional capacity; and monitoring the health situation and assessing health trends. As a delegate in the WHO you will be representing a member state of your choice and try to form a resolution with other states present regarding the topic of the meeting.

Topic: Every year, around 7 million people die of the consequences of air pollution. The biggest part of the victims of air pollution are children. This issue calls for a global response to prevent deseases and deaths. Succesfull air polution reduction would not only benefit the health of people, but would also benefit development and the climate. Delegates of the World Health Organisation will need to tackle the issue of the impact of air pollution on human health and how to prevent it.

Practical information

Everything you need to know about our sixth edition.

The simulation will take place from Thursday the 27th of February 2020 until Sunday March the 1st. The opening ceremony will take place in the “Klooster van de Grauwzusters”, the chapel of the university. This is the address: Lange Sint-Annastraat 7, 2000 Antwerpen. Building S on the city campus of the University of Antwerp. The committee sessions will be held in the conference rooms in the magnificent, historic Hof van Liere building. This is the address: Prinsstraat 13, 2000 Antwerpen.
If you’re interested in becoming a chair in one of our committees, you can apply on our My-MUN page for a position as chair. We will revise your application and get in touch with you. Alternatively you can let us know by filling in the contact form or sending us a mail. We will respond as fast as we can.
Our early bird registrations are open now until early December. You can register to become a delegate on our My-MUN page.
You'll need to make an account on https://mymun.com and apply for the AntwerpMUN/ AMUN of 2020. When you apply as a delegate you’ll have to pay your entrance fee and administration fee. Upon completion you can choose the committee you want to join. We try to make sure everybody can join his/her preferred committee. Then you’ll have to choose your preferred countries that you want to represent in that committee. We try to distribute countries fairly and to everybody’s preference. You’ll get confirmation once you’re accepted. We also ask every delegate to make a position paper a few weeks in advance of our simulation. More information about the position paper can be found a little bit lower on this page.
MyMUN is a platform, database and social network for MUNs and their participants. It hosts countless MUNs from all over the world and has thousands of registered participants. It makes it very easy for participants to find a MUN suitable for them. Applications via MyMUN are easier and safer than via Google Docs or other application forms. It makes organizing the AMUN a lot easier and gives us a better oversight on all applications, chairs, committees and nations present. You can also contact us there easily, find position papers, communicate with fellow MUNers or download files and booklets we upload there for you.
During the first registration wave the fee will be €55 for members and €65 for non-member. In the second wave the prices will be €65 and €75 for members and non-member respectively. An additional administration fee of a few euros will be charged by the MyMUN platform to handle your application. What is included in your fee? Apart from the entrance to the conference and arranging all the goods you need, we will provide you every day with lunch, snacks and drinks during the breaks so you can negotiate at full power. Our evening activities are included in the price as well.
We have an arrangement with some local hostels to accommodate you with a slight discount. Please contact us if you’d like to stay in a hostel during the AMUN. If you prefer not to stay in a hostel we can try to find you an alternative. Accomodation has to be paid for separately by the participant.
Of course we do! Participants from all countries are welcome on our simulation. English will be the language during our MUN so it is accessible for people all over the world.
Your application of MyMUN will be processed when the entrance fee is paid for and you have selected your preferred committees and countries to represent. We will let you know via the platform in which committee you have been placed and which nation you'll be representing. We will try our best to get back to you as soon as possible after your application.
A position paper is a short paper about the view of the country that you will be representing on the topic of the committee. You’ll need to give some general information about your country, the view of that country on the topic of the committee, the goals you want to achieve during the negotiations and how you will get to these goals. More information about the position paper will follow soon in the information booklet you get when you have applied. The deadline will be a few weeks before the simulation so that the chairs have the time to go through the position papers. Why do you have to write a position paper? It guarantees a certain level of quality for the simulation. A position paper is a guideline for you during the simulation and a way to prepare so all delegates can contribute to the committee session. If you can't make a position paper in time or applied after the position paper deadline as a participant, we will just ask you to prepare enough yourself.
You can always reach out to us for any question or remarks that you have. Fill in the contact form, send us a mail, send us a message on Facebook or send us on MyMUN and we will get back to you as fast as we can.

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